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Live Mindfully

The greatest tool I have found in my health and wellness journey has nothing to do with counting my steps each day or drinking green smoothies. My most helpful tool has been to simply take pauses during my daily routines. Instead of constantly searching for advice on what I “should” be doing to feel my best, I try to pause, reflect, and actually listen to what my body needs. A pause helps with shutting off that voice that’s saying, “you called that… Continue reading »

This fall, I returned to graduate school and to say that my life has changed would be an understatement. Aside from papers, projects, and exams, something else that has changed has been my grocery budget. I’m pursuing a degree in nutrition, so eating healthy, fresh food is not only a priority for me, it’s my passion. Sometimes I can get carried away with unnecessary food purchases (looking at you dark chocolate covered almonds) and spend well over my allotted grocery… Continue reading »

We spend a third of lives sleeping. The recommended 7-8 hours of uninterrupted sleep each night is required for refreshing our mind. Neuroscientists have discovered that it is in our sleep that our brain’s specialized networks called the glymphatic system work hard to clear the waste products called the Amyloid B proteins. The rapid clearance of Amyloid B proteins is 60% more productive in sleep possibly preventing us from developing Alzheimer’s disease as we age. Getting the right amount sleep… Continue reading »

DID YOU KNOW? Being GRATEFUL has many health benefits. According to a recent study practicing gratitude everyday may help you sleep better, lower your body aches and pains and help you have healthier hearts. According to Harvard Medical School, Gratitude is “a thankful appreciation for what an individual receives, whether tangible or intangible. With gratitude, people acknowledge the goodness in their lives. As a result, gratitude also helps people connect to something larger than themselves as individuals – whether to… Continue reading »

After decades of decline, stroke deaths have begun rising in adults 35 and older in North Carolina. Stroke is a leading cause of serious long-term disability and the fourth leading cause of death in the state. Small Steps, Bright Future, a North Carolina Stroke Advisory Council Prevention Campaign, focuses on preventing stroke among African Americans who are at a disproportionate risk for stroke. Small Steps, Bright Future highlights endearing moments that could be missed if a person suffers from health complications… Continue reading »

By now you may have heard about the air fryer craze. This kitchen gadget has rivaled the InstaPot for trendiest cooking invention of the decade, and for good reason! Air fryers work by circulating hot air around a metal mesh cooking basket, allowing the food to cook evenly and quickly with little to no added fat. As part of a healthy lifestyle, air fryers can offer an alternative to high calorie styles of cooking. I am the first to admit… Continue reading »

My family and I recently took a cruise to Alaska and it was awesome!  Between all of the activities scheduled during the at sea days and the walking during the days in port, there was plenty to do and despite the 24/7 access to food, I am happy to report that I did not gain weight!  Here are my top 5 tips to not gain weight on a cruise: Take the stairs instead of the elevator on the boat.It is… Continue reading »

Mindful eating is an evidence-based strategy to maintain or lose weight, as eating mindfully helps us pay attention to what and how much we are eating. Mindful eating strategies include paying attention to our hunger levels (as the Grinch would say, “am I eating because I’m bored?”), eating slowly with awareness of each bite, and noticing the taste, texture, and flavors of each food item. Eat One Piece at a Time I am always trying to incorporate more mindful eating… Continue reading »

A recent study1 found that people ate 500 calories a day MORE when they ate ultra-processed foods. This study was conducted in a testing facility where adults were served either foods that were ultra-processed including hot dogs, tater tots, sugary cereal, chips, cookies, and pudding OR unprocessed foods including fresh fruits and vegetables, unsweetened yogurt, beans, nuts, seafood, poultry, and grains. Participants could eat as little or as much as they wanted. For the two weeks when participants ate ultra-processed… Continue reading »

I love pasta!  And when I recently measured, it appeared that my bowls hold about twice as much pasta as I thought.  Much to my dismay, the portion predicted to be only about a cup was actually almost two cups.  In an effort to decrease my portion sizes and increase my vegetable intake, while feeling satisfied with a full bowl, I recently tried an experiment by filling my bowl first with two cups of raw spinach followed by ¾ cup… Continue reading »